Editing Dragon Quest III: The Seeds of Salvation

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The 16-bit version of ''III'' also added the board game-like minigame from ''[[Dragon Quest V]]'', [[Treasures n' Trapdoors]]. The game was also originally slated to have a collectible [[mini medal]] side quest, but this was cut due to cartridge space constraints. While later titles in the series would include this quest in their original releases, all remakes of ''[[Dragon Quest III]]'' have included an extensive mini medal quest. The later Game Boy Color version of the game, which saw release in America in 2001, was based on this version. The GBC edition would include minor balance tweaks, but is mostly recognized for the inclusion of monster medals--gold, silver, and bronze tokens awarded when a particular monster is the last defeated in battle. They do nothing themselves, but attaining all of them opens yet another bonus dungeon with a superboss to vanquish at the end.
 
The 16-bit version of ''III'' also added the board game-like minigame from ''[[Dragon Quest V]]'', [[Treasures n' Trapdoors]]. The game was also originally slated to have a collectible [[mini medal]] side quest, but this was cut due to cartridge space constraints. While later titles in the series would include this quest in their original releases, all remakes of ''[[Dragon Quest III]]'' have included an extensive mini medal quest. The later Game Boy Color version of the game, which saw release in America in 2001, was based on this version. The GBC edition would include minor balance tweaks, but is mostly recognized for the inclusion of monster medals--gold, silver, and bronze tokens awarded when a particular monster is the last defeated in battle. They do nothing themselves, but attaining all of them opens yet another bonus dungeon with a superboss to vanquish at the end.
  
In 2014, an enhanced port of the SNES version was brought to Android and iOS mobile phones. It retains most content from the SNES version and some of the minor balance tweaks from the GBC release, but removes Treasures n' Trapdoors, the monster medal feature, and its associated dungeon. This version was made available outside of Japan on December 4th, 2014 and featured a newly translated script in-line with the standards set by [[Plus-Alpha]] that also does away with the lingering censorship of the GBC version. This version would later be re-released in Japan for the PlayStation 4 and Nintendo 3DS on August 24th, 2017.
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In 2014, an enhanced port of the SNES version was brought to Android and iOS mobile phones. It retains most content from the SNES version and some of the minor balance tweaks from the GBC release, but removes Treasures n' Trapdoors, the monster medal feature, and its associated dungeon. This version was made available outside of Japan on December 4th, 2014 and featured a newly translated script in-line with the standards set by [[Plus-Alpha]] that also does away with the lingering censorship of the GBC version. This version would later be re-released in Japan for the PlayStation 4 and Nintendo 3DS on August 24th, 2018.
  
 
===North American edition (NES edition)===
 
===North American edition (NES edition)===

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