Editing Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past

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''Dragon Quest VII'' was designed by series creator [[Yūji Horii]] and directed by Manabu Yamana. Shintaro Majima signed on as art director, while series veterans [[Akira Toriyama]] and [[Kōichi Sugiyama]] designed the characters and composed the music respectively. Horii has stated in interviews since the game's release that the team focused more on the puzzle solving aspect and the individual stories of the antiquated towns than the game's overarching story. For inspiration, the team pulled from the Old Testament of the Bible, incorporating several judeo-christian themes into the backstory and the scenarios of several plagued towns.  
 
''Dragon Quest VII'' was designed by series creator [[Yūji Horii]] and directed by Manabu Yamana. Shintaro Majima signed on as art director, while series veterans [[Akira Toriyama]] and [[Kōichi Sugiyama]] designed the characters and composed the music respectively. Horii has stated in interviews since the game's release that the team focused more on the puzzle solving aspect and the individual stories of the antiquated towns than the game's overarching story. For inspiration, the team pulled from the Old Testament of the Bible, incorporating several judeo-christian themes into the backstory and the scenarios of several plagued towns.  
  
The game was officially announced in 1996 and originally planned for the [[wikipedia:Nintendo_64DD|Nintendo 64DD]]. On January 15, 1997, it was announced that development had been moved to the PlayStation. By the next day, both stock in [[Wikipedia:Sony|Sony]] and Enix rose significantly in Japan. By 2000, ''Dragon Quest VII'' was predicted to be so successful in Japan that it would "create a 50 billion yen effect on the Japanese economy", said research firm DIHS. ''Dragon Quest VII'' would go on to be released on August 26, 2000 and sold 4.06 million games in Japan alone, becoming one of the highest selling games of all time and ''the'' highest selling title in the series until the release of ''IX'' in 2009.
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The game was officially announced in 1996 and originally planned for the [[wikipedia:Nintendo_64DD|Nintendo 64DD]]. On January 15, 1997, it was announced that development had been moved to the PlayStation. By the next day, both stock in [[Wikipedia:Sony|Sony]] and Enix rose significantly in Japan. By 2000,''Dragon Quest VII'' was predicted to be so successful in Japan that it would "create a 50 billion yen effect on the Japanese economy", said research firm DIHS. ''Dragon Quest VII'' would go on to be released on August 26, 2000 and sold 4.06 million games in Japan alone, becoming one of the highest selling games of all time and ''the'' highest selling title in the series until the release of ''IX'' in 2009.
 
[[File:DQVII Purple Fairy.png|border|right|thumb|275px|The attendant of the shrine of mysteries was created to make navigating the time periods and fragment finding easier.]]
 
[[File:DQVII Purple Fairy.png|border|right|thumb|275px|The attendant of the shrine of mysteries was created to make navigating the time periods and fragment finding easier.]]
 
The game was delayed numerous times before its actual release. Work on the game was extended because the development staff wanted to perfect the game due to high expectations from the fans, and because the team only consisted of about 35 people. Before its release, it was ranked as the most wanted game in Japan and Square, knowing about ''Dragon Quest VII's'' release, moved its ''Final Fantasy IX'' game to come out on a later date so as not to hurt potential sales. Being the first game in the series to include 3D graphics, the team was also initially reluctant to include CG movies and cinematics due to letters written to Enix by fans fearing that doing so would change the overall feeling of the series.  
 
The game was delayed numerous times before its actual release. Work on the game was extended because the development staff wanted to perfect the game due to high expectations from the fans, and because the team only consisted of about 35 people. Before its release, it was ranked as the most wanted game in Japan and Square, knowing about ''Dragon Quest VII's'' release, moved its ''Final Fantasy IX'' game to come out on a later date so as not to hurt potential sales. Being the first game in the series to include 3D graphics, the team was also initially reluctant to include CG movies and cinematics due to letters written to Enix by fans fearing that doing so would change the overall feeling of the series.  
  
The English language localization of ''Dragon Warrior VII'' began directly after the game's Japanese release. Enix of America was tasked with translating over 70,000 pages of text via 20 translators and 5 copy editors, leading to an inconsistent script tone and several plot-holes. No effort was made to edit or censor the context of the Japanese script. The 2013 remake for the Nintendo 3DS was localized in 2016 under the title '''Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past'''. It was translated by UK-based localization specialists Shloc Ltd, and adheres to the tone and style set by the wonderfully silly [[Plus Alpha]].
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The English language localization of ''Dragon Warrior VII'' began directly after the game's Japanese release. Enix of America was tasked with translating over 70,000 pages of text via 20 translators and 5 copy editors, leading to an inconsistent script tone and several plot-holes. No effort was made to edit or censor the context of the Japanese script.
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The 2013 remake for the Nintendo 3DS was localized in 2016 under the title '''Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past'''. It was translated by UK-based localization specialists Shloc Ltd, and adheres to the tone and style set by the wonderfully silly [[Plus Alpha]].
  
 
==Soundtrack==
 
==Soundtrack==

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